Exploring a New Look for Newcastle’s Historic Post

Exploring a New Look for Newcastle’s Historic Post

RPS Australian offices working with Local Aboriginal Land Council to restore 1902 Post Office.

Newcastle Post Office in the early twentieth century (left) and present day (right).

Three of RPS’ Australian businesses have been working closely with the Awabakal Local Aboriginal Land Council (LALC) towards the restoration of the circa 1902 former Newcastle Post Office.

This State heritage listed building is an iconic Newcastle landmark with exceptional community value however is currently in a state of disrepair. It will require a significant quantum of works performed on the building in order to restore it to a serviceable state.

Our Cultural Heritage team have been working with the Awabakal LALC since ownership of the building was transferred to the organisation in January 2015; successfully gaining access to an initial emergency works grant to address urgent repairs.

Following the success of the initial grant, the Cultural Heritage team again worked with Awabakal LALC in securing an additional $150,000 grant to conduct further restoration works.

Our Project Management team were subsequently engaged to administer the grant and project manage this next stage of restoration work, including securing, protecting and preserving the building for future generations and potential development.

The Project Management team have been supported by our Project Approvals & Communications business who provided strategic media advice for the project. As part of an ongoing commitment to the RPS Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), our Cultural Heritage team will continue to assist with the heritage aspects of this project and will prepare necessary exemptions for future works.

Such repairs will be the first step toward Awabakal LALC's vision to restore the historic building. Recommended uses of the building include the creation of a hotel, art gallery, fine-dining restaurant, or a National Indigenous Cultural Institute which could house the largest collection of indigenous Australian art and artefacts anywhere in the world.